A paper on gatsby as a romantic idealist

His whole life was built upon his view of love, and when it was proved false, his life had no foundation, no point. It is an impossible standard of excellence that is not approachable by mortal man. Jay Gatsby was a flawed, imperfect man pursuing perfection.

Daisy is still in love with him, he thinks. He banters with them, dances with them, plays with them. Some may denounce such ideals, as they are foolish or senseless; however, such dreams should be prized, as they are rare if not lost forever in a world of perversion and indolency.

It has no bearing on anything, whatsoever. He crafted ideals for himself, that would enable him to rise above his status, and reach Daisy. What do I mean by true? He took his ideals and goals too far, because his focus was wrong. That would be because I am. As he waits for Daisy to call him, he lingers, still hopeful, for her as he walks to his pool.

Gatsby cannot acknowledge his mistakes, for that would mean giving up on his idealistic views on love and life. Daisy is not perfect, and she is not his.

Gatsby is a hopeless romantic because of his crazy ideals. Again, his ideals, while admirable in the sense of his elegance and charm, with his gentleman behavior and wonderful way of hiding his feelings and being a wonderful host, are flawed by the very parties he hosts.

What once was will be so again. He simply buys an enormous house near Daisy, and throws enormous parties, in the off-chance that she will come, and then he will meet her. Where one is, you can see the other in the background.

He comes to Daisy, in order to be with the one that he loves, and soon becomes a sacrificial lamb. He hides his true feelings, and is the perfect host. His idealistic view of love betrays him yet again, as eventually it comes out that Daisy is indeed torn between the two of them.

In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, is Jay Gatsby a romantic? Support with a quote.

Scott Fitzgerald successfully depicts Jay Gatsby as a Romantic Idealist by presenting the literal actions done by him, and the figurative imagery laced throughout the book.

He cannot do this because it would destroy his very world. And that man was not Jay Gatsby. Gatsby believes, beyond any shadow of doubt, that he loves Daisy in the truest possible way, and that this love must, by the very laws of nature, be returned.

However, there are some, in society, that possess ideals and dreams that transcend themselves. One of the things that kept Daisy from him was money, so Gatsby goes on to contradict his own ideals in the pursuit of what he believed to be greater.

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His ideals were let down, and forgotten. He arranges a meeting at the house of a friend, indeed his only true friend, with her.

Gatsby even believes that he could get Daisy to abandon her family to be with him and revive their previous life that passed five years before.

Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.

These characteristics are one, and they both came into existence at the same time, for each other. He loved Daisy more so than any other girl he had eve met before. He blended his ideals with his love, and both were hopeless, and crazy. His disillusionment with time is further revealed with the elegant period rooms throughout his house.

Scott Fitzgerald, is an extraordinary character. What was once perfect is always perfect. Gatsby strives for ideals that are unreachable, therefore he is indeed a crazy idealistic, for chasing idealist views in a un-idealistic world is crazy.

How he had to leave to go to the war, and how he and Daisy stayed in contact through letters across the world. Hopeless ideals, and crazy love, or crazy ideals and hopeless love, they are one and the same.In his depiction of the idealist, Jay Gatsby, Fitzgerald created a link with America’s literary past and the romantic yearnings of a nation struggling to re-define itself.

If Romanticism exemplifies individualism, idealism, and transcendence, then Jay Gatsby, as a romantic protagonist, testifies to the legacy of Romanticism in American. Romantic Idealist essaysWhat man can be a knight, a savior and a highly dignified man? Jay Gatsby, the title character, in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby can and is.

Fitzgerald, using symbolic imagery, portrays Gatsby as a romantic idealist. Fitzgerald explicitly connects Gatsby to the Romant. The novel The Great Gatsby by famous author mint-body.com Fitzgerald describes an idealist—Gatsby’s whole life. Although mint-body.com Fitzgerald names the novel--The Great Gatsby, great people would never only consider their world views, have unrealistic thoughts, ignore laws like the idealist Gatsby does.

Phoebe Poon, "Romantic Revisionism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Sonnets from the Portuguese" in Scoping the Syllabus (Sydney: English Association, ), Oct 13,  · Scott Fitzgerald successfully depicts Jay Gatsby as a Romantic Idealist by presenting the literal actions done by him, and the figurative imagery laced throughout the book.

Some may denounce such ideals, as they are foolish or senseless; however, such dreams should be prized, as they are rare if not lost forever in a world of Author: Archish. Get an answer for 'In F.

Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, is Jay Gatsby a romantic? Support with a quote.' and find homework help for .

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A paper on gatsby as a romantic idealist
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